Do Ya

 

The Move, Electric Light Orchestra and Jeff Lynne — Do Ya

An in-depth song analysis


The Move
Electric Light Orchestra (Original Version)
Electric Light Orchestra (Solo Version)
  • Record Date: December 19 1971
  • Record Location: Philips Studios, London
  • Written By: Jeff Lynne
  • Produced By: Roy Wood & Jeff Lynne
  • Engineered By: Unknown
  • Performed By: Roy Wood (vocals, guitar, bass), Jeff Lynne (vocals, guitar), Bev Bevan (drums, percussion)

    Initially Released On: California Man 7" single (1972 May 13 — UK — Harvest HAR 5050)

  • Record Date: July, 1976
  • Record Location: Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany (all music except the orchestra and choir; De Lane Lea Studios, Wembley, England)
  • Written By: Jeff Lynne
  • Produced By: Jeff Lynne
  • Engineered By: Mack (Musicland); John Richards & Dick Plant (De Lane Lea)
  • Performed By: Jeff Lynne (guitar, vocals), Bev Bevan (drums, percussion), Richard Tandy (piano, moog synthesizer, guitar, clavinet), Kelly Groucutt (bass, vocals), Mik Kaminski (violin), Hugh McDowell (cello), Melvyn Gale (cello), Louis Clark (orchestra conductor)

    Initially Released On: A New World Record LP album (1976 October — UK — Jet UAG 30017)

  • Record Date: About 2008
  • Record Location: Bungalow Palace Studio, California USA (Jeff Lynne's home studio)
  • Written By: Jeff Lynne
  • Produced By: Jeff Lynne
  • Engineered By: Steve Jay, Ryan Ulyate & Marc Mann
  • Performed By: Jeff Lynne (vocals, guitar, piano, bass, drums, keyboards, cowbell), Marc Mann (strings), Steve Jay (shakers, tambourine)

    Initially Released On: Savages CD album (2012 July 3 — USA — Varese Sarabande 302 067 154 2)

  • Comments and Observations

    Do Ya is unique in that Jeff Lynne first recorded it as a member of The Move for the B-side of their California Man single, then a little less than five years later he recorded it again for the Electric Light Orchestra on their A New World Record album.

    The Move's Do Ya was recorded at Philips Studios in London England on December 19, 1971. The working title of Look Out Baby There's A Plane A Comin' was marked on the tape box, and is the line that Roy Wood shouts at the song's end. It was recorded, along with California Man, in an effort to fulfill The Move's record contracts and partly to finance the Electric Light Orchestra project. Despite the band's intention to keep The Move going, soon after the release of the first ELO album and their brief tour, Roy Wood left the band and The Move no longer existed. As a result, California Man and Do Ya were the final release for The Move.

    Billboard ad for The Move's Do YaThe song was released as a single in England by Harvest records as the B-side of California Man on May 13, 1972 with stock number "HAR 5050". Curiously, both Do Ya and Ella James from the Message From The Country album were both on the B-side, thus it is a three song single. In the USA, it was released on United Artists records as the B-side (and not paired with Ella James) to California Man on June 23, 1972 with stock number "50928". Although it was a B-side track that was not noticed by UK radio, it was flipped by USA radio, making Do Ya the A-side instead. Subsequently, United Artists released a promo single with Do Ya only to promote the flipped single. Because of its USA success and the release of the 1974 California Man LP on the Harvest label, Harvest re-released the song (in edited form) in England on September of 1974 as the A-side with stock number "HAR 5086" and The Move's No Time (taken from the Message From The Country album) on the B-side.

    The Move's Do Ya had no chart placement in the UK because it was not the A-side upon first release and was not promoted on radio (although the A-side, California Man, reached #7). Its rerelease as an A-side in 1974 failed to chart. In the USA, because the DJs were more interested in the single's B-side rather than the A-side, it entered the Billboard Hot 100 on October 28, 1972 and spent a very modest five weeks on the chart reaching a high of only #93. That statistic may seem insignificant, but it marks The Move's only entry into the USA Billboard charts and Jeff Lynne's first ever entry. The song entered the Cash Box chart for one short week on November 4, 1972 at #97.

    Although this was the last song by The Move, Jeff Lynne kept the song alive by placing it into the live set of Electric Light Orchestra on several of the following tours, sometimes pairing it with the 10538 Overture performances. He must have believed in the song, because it was less than five years later that he rerecorded the song as an Electric Light Orchestra song.

    The basic track of Electric Light Orchestra's Do Ya was recorded at Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany and the orchestra and choir were recorded later at De Lane Lea Studios in Wembley, England. It was the same basic arrangement as the version by The Move, but for the addition of the orchestra backing and a different ending.

    Billboard ad for ELO's Do Ya stretching across multiple pagesThe song was originally released in the UK and USA on October 1976 on the A New World Record album. It was not released as a single in the UK. However, it was the second single release from the album and ELO's tenth single release in the USA, being released in February 1977 on the United Artists label with stock number "UA-XW 939-Y" and Nightrider from the Face The Music album on the B-side.

    As the Electric Light Orchestra version of Do Ya was not a single in the UK, it had no chart success. In the USA, it entered the Billboard Hot 100 on February 5, 1977, spent 12 weeks on the chart and peaked at #24 on April 2, 1977. It was ELO's seventh Billboard chart single. Also in the USA, it entered the Cash Box Top 100 on February 5, 1977, spent 14 weeks on the chart and peaked at #16 on April 2, 1977.

    There are several notable changes between the Move version and the Electric Light Orchestra version. Most obvious is the addition of an orchestra with several prominent cello riffs in the ELO version. The ELO version adds an extra line to the end of the second verse ("And I heard the police playin' with their guns"), has an altogether different ending (cutting the "Look out baby there's a plane a comin'" line for a slower tempo part), and all of Roy Wood's lines are sung by Jeff Lynne. Also of note is that the lyrics to the choruses were changed up a bit, where as The Move version was "do ya, do ya want my life, love, face and mind", the ELO version changed it to "love, face, mind, love". The change to "love, face, mind, love" first appeared during the Face The Music tour performances, before the song was recorded for the A New World Record album. Although the "Look out baby there's a plane a comin'" line is cut, Jeff does pay homage to it, of sorts, by crying "Ah, look out!" near the end of the song.

    Bassist Kelly Groucutt's vocals can be heard very clearly over the "but I never seen nothin' like you" line. Kelly begins the "but I" part and Jeff joins him on harmony vocals near the end of the sustained "I" note. Also of interest is that while the guitars on the ELO version are played with a much harder edge to them, The Move version has a much more raw and spontaneous sound and is generally the preferred version by fans and critics because of it.

    Tom Petty has stated that his 1982 song Change Of Heart from his Long After Dark album was inspired by and an attempt to make a song like The Move's Do Ya. The crunchy guitar riff from that song, which can be heard HERE is the primary indicator. Although curiously, Tom has also stated that he didn't think his song was very good.

    Also, an edit of ELO's version of Do Ya was used as the soundtrack to the job search website, monster.com, during the summer of 2005 (in the USA) and summer of 2006 (in both the UK and USA). Television commercials featured the song, while actors danced around in joy to just having gotten their dream jobs. It was also used in the radio ads.

    In the late 2000s, Jeff Lynne rerecording a new solo version of the song, wherein he is thought to have played all the instruments himself in his own home studio. He stays as faithful as possible to the 1976 A New World Record album version, although the cowbell sounding drums from the Move version is also included. Ostensibly this was done because Jeff felt that he could improve the the song (and other ELO hits that appear on the Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra) using modern recording techniques, stating that when he hears the original recordings, he's not entirely happy with them. Some have suggested that Jeff may have rerecorded it because he does not own the full rights to the original songs. Instead the rights are owned by Sony and when the songs are used in films, ads and other money making ventures, Sony gets most (if not all) of the money. By being able to market his own self-recorded versions, Jeff gets all the money instead. Jeff, however, denies this is the reason for the rerecordings.

    This rerecorded solo version of the song first appeared in the summer of 2012 on the Savages soundtrack and later in the year on the Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra featuring several of these rerecorded hits. It's not entirely clear if the newer solo version should be credited to Jeff Lynne alone or Electric Light Orchestra. All sources and interviews are very clear that these are Jeff Lynne solo recordings, yet there has been no definitive statement about exactly how the artist for the recordings should be credited. The Savages soundtrack credits it to Jeff Lynne. Strangely, the Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra collection gives only the album's title and does not state the artist anywhere. Other sources such as iTunes credit the artist as Electric Light Orchestra. And Frontiers Records shop originally did not give an artist credit, but revised the artist to Electric Light Orchestra shortly after release. Yet clearly these are solo recordings. Jeff, in interviews, implies that this is to be an Electric Light Orchestra recording as the "group" is now a one-man band and he is the band.

    At one point, the song was intended to be part of the 2007 Broadway stage play of Xanadu (under the misnomer Do Ya (Want My Love)), but it was cut from the final production. The song was performed by the Broadway cast on television at a Tony Awards Preview Concert in the summer of 2008.

    Structure and Lyrics

    Below is the structure of the fullest, most complete version of the originally released songs as available on the standard California Man single, A New World Record album and Savages soundtrack album.

    The Move
    Electric Light Orchestra (Original Version)
    Electric Light Orchestra (Solo Version)
    -Guitar intro
       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #2
       Guitar Riff #3 with drums
       Guitar Riff #4 with drums
       Guitar build-up
       Ahhhhh...
    -Verse 1
       In this life I've seen everything I can see woman
       I've seen lovers flying through the air hand in hand
       I've seen babies dancing in the midnight sun
       And I've seen dreams that came from the heavenly skies above
       I've seen old men crying at their own grave sides
       And I've seen pigs all sittin' watching, picture slides
       But I never seen nothing like you

    -Chorus 1
       Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind

    -Verse 2
       Well I, heard the crowd singin' out of tune
       As they, sat and sang Auld Lang Syne by the light of the moon
       I heard the preachers bangin' on the drums
       But I never heard nothin' like you

    -Bridge
       In the country where the sky touches down on the field
       She lay her down to rest in the morning sun
       They come a'runnin' just to get a look
       Just to feel, to touch her long black hair
       They don't give a damn

       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #2 with drums
       Guitar Riff #3 with drums
       Guitar Riff #4 with drums
       Guitar build-up
       Ah!
    -Chorus 2
       Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind

    -Verse 3
       Well I think you understand what I'm trying to say woman
       That is I'd like to save you for a rainy day
       I've seen enough of the world to know, baby
       That I've got to get it all to get it all to grow

    -Chorus 3
       Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind

    -Chorus Break
       Guitar riff with vocals singing Ah, you better believe it! [this lyric is uncertain]
       Rolling drums
    -Chorus 4
       Do ya, do ya want my life
       Do ya, do ya want my love
       Do ya, do ya want my face
       Do ya, do ya want my mind

    -Ending
       Look out baby there's a plane a comin'
    -Guitar intro
       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #2
       Guitar Riff #3
       Guitar Riff #4 with drums
       Guitar and Cello build-up
       Yeah!
    -Verse 1
       In this life I've seen everything I can see woman
       I've seen lovers flying through the air hand in hand
       I've seen babies dancing in the midnight sun
       And I've seen dreams that came from the heavenly skies above
       I've seen old men crying at their own grave sides
       And I've seen pigs all sittin' watching, picture slides
       But I never seen nothing like you

    -Chorus 1
       Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Verse 2
       Well I, heard the crowd singin' out of tune
       As they, sat and sang Auld Lang Syne by the light of the moon
       I heard the preachers bangin' on the drums
       And I heard the police playin' with their guns
       But I never heard nothin' like you

    -Bridge
       In the country where the sky touches down on the field
       She lay her down to rest in the morning sun
       They come a'runnin' just to get a look
       Just to feel, to touch her long black hair
       They don't give a damn

       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #4 with cello and drums
       Guitar Riff #5 with cello and drums
       Cello build-up
       But I never seen nothin' like you
    -Chorus 2
       Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Verse 3
       Rolling drums
       Well I think you know what I'm trying to say woman
       That is I'd like to save you for a rainy day
       I've seen enough of the world to know, baby
       That I've got to get it all to get it all to grow

    -Chorus 3
       Do ya, do ya want my love, come on now
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, come on now
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Ending
       Ah, look out!
       Do ya, do ya want my love
       Do ya, do ya want my love
       Ah, woah
    -Guitar intro
       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #2
       Guitar Riff #3
       Guitar Riff #4 with drums
       Guitar and Cello build-up
       Yeah!
    -Verse 1
       In this life I've seen everything I can see woman
       I've seen lovers flying through the air hand in hand
       I've seen babies dancing in the midnight sun
       And I've seen dreams that came from the heavenly skies above
       I've seen old men crying at their own grave sides
       And I've seen pigs all sittin' watching picture slides
       But I never seen nothing like you

    -Chorus 1
       Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Verse 2
       Well I, heard the crowd singin' out of tune
       As they, sat and sang Auld Lang Syne by the light of the moon
       I heard the preachers bangin' on the drums
       And I heard the police playin' with their guns
       But I never heard nothin' like you

    -Bridge
       In the country where the sky touches down on the field
       She lay her down to rest in the morning sun
       They come a'runnin' just to get a look
       Just to feel, to touch her long black hair
       They don't give a damn

       Guitar Riff #1
       Guitar Riff #4 with cello and drums
       Guitar Riff #5 with cello and drums
       Cello build-up
       But I never seen nothin' like you
    -Chorus 2
       Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, I'm sayin'
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Verse 3
       Rolling drums
       Well I think you know what I'm trying to say woman
       That is I'd like to save you for a rainy day, yeah
       I've seen enough of the world to know
       That I've got to get it all to get it all to grow

    -Chorus 3
       Do ya, do ya want my love, come on now
       Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
       Do ya, do ya want my mind, alright, yeah
       Do ya, do ya want my love

    -Ending
       Ah, look out!
       Do ya, do ya want my love
       Do ya, do ya want my love
       Oh, woah
    Lyrics in GREEN feature Roy on lead vocals; all others are Jeff.
    Lyric sheet from USA A New World Record album

    Original Lyric Sheet from A New World Record

    Variations

    There are four known non-live variations of the original Do Ya by The Move. They are:

    -Do Ya (Standard Release)
    -Do Ya (7" Single Edit Version)
    -Do Ya (Alternate Version)
    -Do Ya (Edited Alternate Version)

    The 7" Single Edit Version simply cuts the song's bridge. The alternate version is a different mix, possibly an early mix or a mix prepared for BBC Radio 1's Dave Lee Travis Show, wherein the guitars are much more prominent in the mix, especially over the choruses. It has an extra guitar riff added to the beginning of the fourth and final chorus. And the "Look out baby there's a plane a'comin'" is pushed down into the mix and some goon show style adlibbing is mixed in over the song's ending. The song does not fade, but instead continues to the end of the take, which includes a bit of studio banter after the band finishes playing. There is a bit of studio banter and guitar at the song's beginning. The Edited Alternate Version is simply the alternate version, where the studio banter at the songs beginning is cut, the extra guitar riff is cut, and it has the same fading end as the standard single version.

    Song Section Lyric/Part Do Ya (Standard Release)
    Do Ya (7" Single Edit Version)
    Do Ya (Alternate Version)
    Do Ya (Edited Alternate Version)
    Studio banter Studio banter
    -
    -
    YES
    -
    Guitar lead-in Guitar lead-in
    -
    -
    YES
    -
    Guitar intro Guitar Riff #1
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #2
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #3 with drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #4 with drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar build-up
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Ahhhhh...
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 1 In this life I've seen everything I can see woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen lovers flying through the air hand in hand
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen babies dancing in the midnight sun
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I've seen dreams that came from the heavenly skies above
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen old men crying at their own grave sides
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I've seen pigs all sittin' watching, picture slides
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    But I never seen nothing like you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 1 Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 2 Well I, heard the crowd singin' out of tune
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    As they, sat and sang Auld Lang Syne by the light of the moon
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I heard the preachers bangin' on the drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    But I never heard nothin' like you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Bridge In the country where the sky touches down on the field
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    She lay her down to rest in the morning sun
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    They come a'runnin' just to get a look
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Just to feel, to touch her long black hair
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    They don't give a damn
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #1
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #2 with drums
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #3 with drums
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #4 with drums
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar build-up
    YES
    -
    YES
    YES
    Ah!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 2 Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 3 Well I think you understand what I'm trying to say woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    That is I'd like to save you for a rainy day
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen enough of the world to know, baby
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    That I've got to get it all to get it all to grow
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 3 Do ya, do ya want my life, woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love, I'm sayin'
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus Break Guitar riff with vocals singing...
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Yeah, yeah, yeah!
    -
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar riff with vocals singing You got it baby... [unintelligible]
    -
    -
    YES
    YES
    Guitar riff with vocals singing...
    -
    -
    YES
    YES
    Ah, you better believe it! [?]
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Rolling drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar riffs
    -
    -
    YES
    -
    Chorus 4 Do ya, do ya want my life
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Ending Look out baby there's a plane a comin'
    YES
    YES
    YES, but vocal line is pushed down in the mix
    YES, but vocal line is pushed down in the mix
    Goon show style vocals and percussion
    -
    -
    YES
    YES, but goon show style vocals are pushed down in the mix

    There are four known non-live variations of the song Do Ya by Electric Light Orchestra. They are:

    -Do Ya (Standard Electric Light Orchestra Version)
    -Do Ya (USA Mono Single Version)
    -Do Ya (Edited A Perfect World Of Music LP Version)
    -Do Ya (Unedited Alternate Mix)

    The mono single version was available on the B-side of the USA issued promotional single and is a stereo to mono mix down of the standard A New World Record album version. The edited version that appeared on the German issued A Perfect World Of Music LP (but not the CD) on Jet Records (JET 24043) simply cuts the second chorus and the third verse. The unedited alternate version released on the Flashback boxed set has different mix, including additional strings on the bridge, additional percussion, additional background vocals, lead vocals more up front in the mix, and extra guitar riffs on the intro and bridge.

    Song Section Lyric/Part Do Ya (Standard Electric Light Orchestra Version)
    Do Ya (USA Mono Single Version)
    Do Ya (Edited A Perfect World Of Music LP Version) Do Ya (Unedited Alternate Mix)
    Guitar intro Guitar Riff #1
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #2
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #3
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #4 with drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #5 with drums
    -
    -
    YES
    Guitar Riff #6 with drums
    -
    -
    YES
    Guitar and Cello build-up
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 1 Yeah!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    In this life I've seen everything I can see woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen lovers flying through the air hand in hand
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen babies dancing in the midnight sun
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I've seen dreams that came from the heavenly skies above
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I've seen old men crying at their own grave sides
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I've seen pigs all sittin' watching, picture slides
    YES
    YES
    YES
    But I never seen nothing like you
    YES
    YES
    YES, but preceded by a four second longer guitar and cello lead-in
    Chorus 1 Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I'm sayin'
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind, I need it
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 2 Well I, heard the crowd singin' out of tune
    YES
    YES
    YES
    As they, sat and sang Auld Lang Syne by the light of the moon
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I heard the preachers bangin' on the drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I heard the police playin' with their guns
    YES
    YES
    YES
    But I never heard nothin' like you
    YES
    YES
    YES, but preceded by a four second longer guitar and cello lead-in
    Bridge In the country where the sky touches down on the field
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She lay her down to rest in the morning sun
    YES
    YES
    YES
    They come a'runnin' just to get a look
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Just to feel, to touch her long black hair
    YES
    YES
    YES
    They don't give a damn
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #1
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #2
    -
    -
    YES
    Guitar Riff #3 with cello and drums
    -
    -
    YES
    Guitar Riff #4 with cello and drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Guitar Riff #5 with cello and drums
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Cello build-up
    YES
    YES
    YES
    But I never seen nothin' like you
    YES
    YES
    YES, but preceded by a four second longer guitar and cello lead-in
    Chorus 2 Do ya, do ya want my love, woman
    YES
    -
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I'm sayin'
    YES
    -
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind, I need it
    YES
    -
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    -
    YES
    Verse 3 Rolling drums
    YES
    -
    YES, but a couple of seconds longer
    Well I think you understand what I'm trying to say woman
    YES
    -
    YES, but with backing vocals singing Do ya, do ya want my love
    That is I'd like to save you for a rainy day
    YES
    -
    YES, but with backing vocals singing Do ya, do ya want my face
    I've seen enough of the world to know, baby
    YES
    -
    YES, but with backing vocals singing Do ya, do ya want my mind
    That I've got to get it all to get it all to grow
    YES
    -
    YES, but with backing vocals singing Do ya, do ya want my love
    Chorus 3 Do ya, do ya want my love, come on now
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my face, I need it
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my mind, come on now
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Ending Ah, look out!
    YES
    YES
    YES, but missing the vocal line
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Do ya, do ya want my love
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Ah, woah
    YES
    YES
    YES

    There are no known variations of the Jeff Lynne solo recording of Do Ya.

    Music Charts

    These are the known statistics for The Move's Do Ya in various countries' music charts. If you can fill in the missing information or know of charting information in other countries, please let me know at the email address listed at the bottom of this page.

    Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6
    UK Official Top 50 - Not released as an A-side single in the UK
    USA Billboard Hot 100 Chart Entry Date: October 28, 1972
    98
    97
    96
    94
    93
    (November 25, 1972)
    USA Cash Box Top 100 Chart Entry Date: November 4, 1972
    97
    (November 4, 1972)
    USA Record World Top 100 Chart Entry Date: November 4, 1972
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Peak of 88
    during a run of 6 weeks on the chart

    These are the known statistics for Electric Light Orchestra's Do Ya in various country's music charts. If you can fill in the missing information or know of charting information in other countries, please let me know at the email address listed at the bottom of this page.

    Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 Week 13 Week 14
    UK Not released as a single in the UK
    USA Billboard Hot 100 Chart Entry Date: February 5, 1977
    84
    72
    57
    46
    38
    33
    28
    25
    24
    (April 2, 1977)
    29
    57
    100
    USA Cash Box Top 100 Chart Entry Date: February 5, 1977
    80
    59
    41
    32
    23
    20
    18
    17
    16
    (April 2, 1977)
    24
    26
    31
    39
    96
    USA Record World Top 100 Chart Entry Date: February 5, 1977
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Peak at #25 after a run of 13 weeks on the chart
    Germany Chart Entry Date: April 23, 1977
    42
    (April 23, 1977)
    Out of chart
    Out of chart
    44
    45
    44

    The Jeff Lynne solo recording of Do Ya has not charted at all. It was not released as single.

    Releases

    Here are all the known USA and UK releases of the song:

    The Move - Do Ya (Standard Release)

    The Move - Do Ya (7" Single Edit Version)

    The Move - Do Ya (Alternate Version)

    The Move - Do Ya (Edited Alternate Version)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (ELO 2 Tour)

    Electric Light Orchesra - 10538 Overture (Long Beach May 12, 1974)
    (Uses a small portion of the Do Ya guitar riff)

    Electric Light Orchesra - 10538 Overture (Remix Version) (Long Beach May 12, 1974)
    (Uses a small portion of the Do Ya guitar riff)

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (Winterland February 14, 1976)

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (London June 20, 1976)

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (Portsmouth June 22, 1976)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Electric Light Orchestra Version)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (USA Mono Single Version)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Edited A Perfect World Of Music LP Version)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Unedited Alternate Mix)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (The Midnight Special - February, 1977)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (A New World Record Tour)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Wembley - June 1978)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Stereo Mix Wembley 1978)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (5.1 Mix Wembley 1978)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Time Tour)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Rocker Medley: Ma-Ma-Ma Belle/Do Ya/Rockaria! (Heartbeat 86, March 15 1986)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Rocker Medley: Ma-Ma-Ma Belle/Do Ya/Rockaria! (Balance Of Power Tour)

    Electric Light Orchestra - ELO Remix - 40 Principales (featuring a Do Ya sample)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (VH1 Storytellers, April 20, 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Los Angeles, May 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (5.1 Mix - Los Angeles, May 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Solo Version)

    Tours

    The Move never performed Do Ya live. As it was the last item ever recorded by The Move, there were no live performances following its release other than a BBC stage performance of California Man.

    The song was used in early Electric Light Orchestra live performances before the recording on the A New World Record album. It was not played in the brief Electric Light Orchestra tour, but it appeared in full for the ELO 2 tour, although it is thought to have only been performed for the North American shows. Unlike later ELO tours, for the ELO 2 tour performances, the band performed The Move version, sans cellos and complete with Jeff adding the "Look out baby, there's a-plane a comin'" bit at the end. For the On The Third Day tour, the Do Ya guitar riffs, mixed with cello riffs, were added to the middle of the performance of 10538 Overture. It was not used in the Eldorado tour at all, however, it was used on the Face The Music tour as part of a medley with 10538 Overture, where the first half of the song is 10538 Overture and the last half of the song is Do Ya using first verse and first chorus (where the new "love, face, mind, love" lyrics were used) and Kelly Groucutt's "but i" vocal lead-in to the chorus.

    Do Ya was played on all Electric Light Orchestra tours following its release on A New World Record. On all live performances afterwards, the guitar riffs on the intro and the bridge were extended and played with very hard rock guitar compared the album version. Also, the third verse was cut in all live performances.

    The live performances that have seen official release are two versions from the On The Third Day tour (both variations of the Long Beach concert performance of 10538 Overture), two versions from the Face The Music tour (Winterland and London), one version from the Out Of The Blue tour (Wembley) and one version from the PBS performance for the aborted Zoom tour. Performances of Do Ya from the ELO 2, A New World Record, Time and Balance Of Power tours have not been officially released, although they have been bootlegged from various sources. The performances on the ELO 2 and A New World Record tour was the full song. The Time tour performance was as part of a hits medley following the song Confusion in the medley, then playing only the guitar intro, the first verse and the first chorus before merging into Rockaria!. The Balance Of Power tour performance was as part of another hits medley, this time following the song Ma-Ma-Ma Belle in the medley, then playing only the guitar intro, the first verse through the second chorus before merging into Rockaria!.

    Pictures

    UK 7-inch single A-side (Harvest HAR 5050) UK 7-inch single B-side (Harvest HAR 5050) USA 7-inch single A-side (United Artists 50928) USA 7-inch single B-side (United Artists 50928) USA 7-inch single A-side (United Artists 50928) USA 7-inch single B-side (United Artists 50928) UK 7-inch reissue single (Harvest HAR 5086) Brazil 7-inch reissue single (Harvest 7HV-11001)
    The Move's UK vinyl single * Harvest * HAR 5050
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya and Ella James]
    The Move's California Man USA stock vinyl single * United Artists * 50928
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya]
    The Move's Do Ya USA promo vinyl single * United Artists * 50928
    [b/w Do Ya]
    The Move's UK vinyl single * Harvest * HAR 5086
    [b/w No Time]
    The Move's Brazil vinyl single * Harvest * 7HV-11001
    Image used with kind permission of Patrik Guttenbacher
    Canada 7-inch single A-side (United Artists 50928) Canada 7-inch single B-side (United Artists 50928) Germany 7-inch single A-side (Harvest 1C006-05 045) Germany 7-inch single B-side (Harvest 1C006-05 045) Spain 7-inch reissue single (Harvest 1J 006-05.045) Yugoslavia 7-inch single A-side (Harvest SHAR-88558) Yugoslavia 7-inch single B-side (Harvest SHAR-88558) USA 7-inch stock single (United Artists UA-XW 939-Y)
    The Move's Canada vinyl single * United Artists * 50928
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya]
    The Move's Germany vinyl single * Harvest * 1C006-05 045
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya and Ella James]
    The Move's Spain vinyl single * Harvest * 1J 006-05.045
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya and Ella James]
    The Move's Yugoslavia vinyl single * Harvest * SHAR-88558
    [A-side California Man b/w Do Ya and Ella James]
    ELO's USA vinyl stock single * United Artists * UA-XW 939-Y
    [b/w Nightrider]
    USA 7-inch promo single (United Artists UA-XW 939-Y) UK/USA A New World Record LP USA 7-inch reissue single (United Artists US X 1178-Y) Canada 7-inch single (United Artists UA-XW 939-Y) Canada 7-inch reissue single (United Artists XW 1132)
    ELO's USA vinyl promo single * United Artists * UA-XW 939-Y
    [b/w Do Ya Mono]
    ELO's UK A New World Record vinyl LP * Jet * UAG 30017 ELO's USA vinyl single * Silver Spotlight United Artists * US X 1178-Y
    [b/w Nightrider]
    ELO's Canada vinyl single * United Artists * UA-XW 939-Y
    [b/w Nightrider]
    Image used with kind permission of Jon Lock
    ELO's Canada vinyl single * United Artists * XW 1132
    [b/w Evil Woman]
    Germany 7-inch reissue single (United Artists 36 235 AT) Germany 7-inch promo reissue single (United Artists 36 235 AT) Italy 7-inch single A-side (Jet JetSP 500) Italy 7-inch single B-side (Jet JetSP 500) Japan 7-inch reissue single (United Artists CM-115) Philippines 7-inch reissue single (United Artists UA-50191)
    ELO's Germany stock vinyl single * Jet United Artists * 36 235 AT
    [b/w Poker]
    Image used with kind permission of Jon Lock
    ELO's Germany promo vinyl single * Jet United Artists * 36 235 AT
    [b/w Poker]
    ELO's Italy promo vinyl single * Jet * JetSP 500
    [A-side Telephone Line b/w Do Ya]
    ELO's Japan vinyl single * United Artists * CM-115
    [b/w Can't Get It Out Of My Head]
    Image used with kind permission of Jon Lock
    ELO's Philippines vinyl single * United Artists * UA-50191
    [b/w Shangri-La]
    Image used with kind permission of Jon Lock
    Spain 7-inch 40 Principales single (Epic MELP 3006) Thailand 7-inch reissue single (Royalsound TKR-459) Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra album with solo version
    Spain ELO Remix - 40 Principales 7" promo single * Epic * MELP 3006 [1990] ELO's Thailand vinyl single * Royalsound * TKR-459
    Image used with kind permission of Jon Lock
    Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra album containing newer solo version

    Cover Versions

    Use in Movies and TV Programs

    The Move - Do Ya

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Original Version)

    Scene from LAX TV show ELO's version of Do Ya was used in an interesting way in the sixth episode of the USA based television show LAX, starring Heather Locklear and Blair Underwood. The episode is entitled Unscheduled Arrivals and first broadcast on October 18, 2004. In the storyline, there was an infectious disease scare at the airport on a recently arrived flight. Everyone who was in contact with its passengers had to go through full body decontamination. This meant that everyone had to strip down to their bare skin and submit to scrub downs and disinfection. The scene starts with everyone getting in line for the decontamination and the guitar riffs of ELO's Do Ya kicks in. With the line "in this life I've seen everything thing I can see woman" Heather Locklear's character, takes her top off (with her hands hiding her bare breasts, of course). The song then quiets down to allow for the character's dialog. Next, when the two main characters, who have a bit of sexual tension between them, make eye to naked body contact, Do Ya kicks back in with the main chorus ("Do ya, do you want my love"). So whoever put this together obviously had some intimate knowledge of the song's lyrics because the scene was put together to match the lyrics. It was just about the full song, too, with it being faded just a few seconds early. What a treat! As a side note, LAX also featured the first 60 seconds of ELO's Mr. Blue Sky as the show's theme song.

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Solo Version)


    Sheet Music

           
    Sheet music for Electric Light Orchestra version as published in the USA.

    Promotional Videos and TV Performances

    Do Ya promo videoThere is a promotional video made of Electric Light Orchestra's Do Ya that features the band playing on a small room. Jeff is wearing a white button-down shirt that is unbuttoned. This video was a lip synched performance of the standard A New World Record album version of the song. The video has never been commercially released. Similar videos for Livin' Thing, Tightrope and Telephone Line were produced, but the Do Ya video stands out as having a very smoky atmosphere to it. The promo video HERE.

    Do Ya on The Midnight SpecialTelevised erformances are known to include a completely live performance on the USA's The Midnight Special program with the first broadcast on March 5, 1977 with ELO as host (recorded between February 8 and 11). This same performance was rebroadcast on April 1, 1977 with George Carlin hosting, and again on April 29, 1977 with Wolfman Jack hosting. The appearance on The Midnight Special can be seen HERE.

    The live performance from the Heartbeat 86 concert was also broadcast on UK television.

    Fan Comments

    Enter comments only about this song. (Inappropriate comments will be removed.)


    In the Promo Video............I've read that Jeff has a chew of tobacco in his mouth.........any truth to that rumor............THANKS :)
    -Anonymous

    Editor: That's a weird one. Never heard that before. I've always noticed that Jeff has had a bit of a slack jaw in the video making his bottom lip hang kinda sloppy, but I doubt that it's tobacco. Jeff smoked at the time, but I've never heard of him chewing.


    Do Ya has been with me since The Move! It has been a staple in my musical collection. The initial raw guitar riffs goes right up and down my spine and the whole attitude of the song resonates for me! Bravo!
    -KE in Northern California

    Anybody got the chords for the bridge? That's the tricky bit.
    -Anonymous

    Artwork by Lynnette Johansson for Do Ya
    -Fan artwork by Lynnette "Cicky" Johansson

    Wasn't the field (snare) drum break in the middle of Do Ya dubbed in from a (sporting?) event at some stadium?? I probably saw that on the liner notes, but cannot find mention of it here....
    -Anonymous

    I like the Move's version of this song better...seems a bit grittier. I am a HUGE Jeff Lynne fan, and think all his songs are amazing. I always wondered if he was high when he wrote the "trippy" lyrics to this song, though.
    -Anonymous

    Quotations

    The Move - Do Ya (Standard Release)
    Near the end of the song, Roy Wood shouts out the line "Look out baby there's a plane a comin'." There has been some doubt among fans over the years if that's what Roy was actually shouting, but it has been verified by Rob Caiger.

    "[Jeff Lynne's] position as scintillating japester would be secure even if he never wrote another thing after the Move's Do Ya, whose ludicrously surreal lyrics and hilarious seccession of + flash lick-heisting made the song one of the delights of 1972."
    James Isaacs (September 27, 1973 Rolling Stone review of Electric Light Orchestra II)

    "Do Ya--rated single of the year in the rock press, apparently the only place it was distributed--signals a phase in the Move's career that comprises four songs, three uncharacteristically rock-and-rolly and all prime."
    Robert Christgau (circa 1973 - Split Ends review on www.robertchristgau.com)

    "The Move were down to Roy Wood and Bev Bevan in the wake of assorted traumas, and Jeff was added as very much the junior partner. But that's where the ironies begin. The Move's biggest single in the states was Do Ya written by Jeff, and Roy Wood has still failed to crack the American market, despite some 26 hit singles on his home ground."
    Bob Edmands (April 1976 - New Musical Express)

    "The next Move single proved to be an epic event in pop/rock music. Released in Britain on a maxi-single (where it was stuck on the B-side, with Ella James, of Wood's California Man), Do Ya was only a moderate hit initially, but has maintained a phenomenal popularity. California Man is a strong Wood rocker in the '50s mold-- but Do Ya is positively the best song the Move ever recorded, and one of Lynne's finest compositions. The vocal harmony (Wood and Lynne) is superb; their voices blend like some other-worldly musical instrument. Wood's slide guitar bits add just the right plaintive touch, Bevan's drumming thunders along like a juggernaut... and catch the cowbell and woodblock! The lyrics feature the typical Lynne strangeness associated with all of ELO's better songs. UA's re-release of Tonight after Do Ya, good as it is, was hopelessly anticlimactic and, needless to add, another flop."
    Joel Bellman (December 1976 - Trouser Press #17)

    "The Move was still very much Wood's band, although Lynne did contribute to the writing - his most notable compositions being Do Ya, (re-recorded by ELO on A New World Record), which was the flip side of the Move's later singles, California Man. In the States, though, Do Ya was nominated as the A side and climbed to around number 70 in the American charts, the highest the band ever achieved in the States. "
    Harry Doherty (April 2, 1977 - Melody Maker)
    Editor's Note: The claim of Do Ya making #70 on the US charts may be using a chart other than Billboard as according to Billboard, the song only reached #93.

    "[The Move's] Do Ya would also become an ELO hit on A New World Record."
    Steve Wosahla (April 10, 1978 Good Times #194)

    "While with the Move, Lynne helped record Message From The Country, perhaps their best album, and penned Do Ya, his finest rock & roll song."
    Mikal Gilmore (August 24, 1978 - Rolling Stone #272)

    "Kiss members must have a thing for ELO, as ex-guitarist Ace Frehley has released a cover version of Do Ya as a single in the UK and US, and it also appears on his solo LP Trouble Walkin' (Mega Force/Atlantic K7820421). Not having heard, it, we can't comment!"
    Unknown (1989 - Face The Music fanzine #6)

    "... [Jeff Lynne] reckons the Move original is better [than the later re-recording by the Electric Light Orchestra.] 'It's got a certain charm, however rough it might be.'"
    Ira Robbins (1990 liner notes for Afterglow)

    "Do Ya, was every critic's pick to click in 1972 but didn't impact commercially until it was smoothed over for ELO by author Lynne, whose input is essential [on the Great Move!: The Best of the Move album]."
    Robert Christgau (1995 - Details magazine)

    "California Man//Do Ya/Ella James went up to No. 9 in the U.K. In the United States the single was released with only California Man and Do Ya on it. By [1972] singles in the United States had no A-side and B-side marks on the label, so it didn't matter that Roy's California Man got low airplay. The US DJ's made Jeff's Do Ya the 'A-side' and it gained the Move their only chart success peaking at No. 88 in November 1972. [...] ...and Roy was singing main-lead vocals on Do Ya, which originally Jeff wrote and kept in mind for an E.L.O. track. This record was the final new product by The Move, although the group didn't disband officially until now. The contractual obligations of The Move were taken over by The Electric Light Orchestra."
    Patrik Guttenbacher, Marc Haines, & Alexander von Petersdorff (1996 Unexpected Messages)

    "One multitrack tape exists from the first ELO 2 recording session at Philips Studios in May 1972, containing From The Sun To The World and In Old England Town. Extra tape spliced on after these tracks had missing sessions for two of The Move's most famous EMI songs, California Man and Do Ya."
    Rob Caiger (2002 - liner notes for ELO 2 remaster CD)

    "Even though Lynne, Bevan and Wood were busy promoting ELO's debut which had just been released in the UK on 3 December 1971, they went back into the studio as The Move on 19 December to record what would ultimately be the group's swansong. California Man was another new Roy Wood song and was recorded in seven takes, together with Jeff Lynne's Look Out Baby, There's A Plane Coming, later retitled Do Ya. Both were important songs for The Move, with California Man their last UK hit single at no. 7, while b-side Do Ya was promoted to the a-side in the States and became The Move's sole US hit."
    Rob Caiger (2005 - 1971: The Original Message article on themoveonline.com)

    "Six months [after the release of Chinatown] the band were on their way to No. 7 with their latest single. A three-track maxi, the B-side featured Ella James and Do Ya, one of Jeff's most arresting rockers which would go on to give The Move their only US Top 100 hit later that year, albeit peaking at a modest No. 93. Two years on, Do Ya was released as a UK Harvest single in its own right. A revamped version appeared on ELO's sixth album A New World Record in 1976 and remained a permanent and popular fixture in their live set."
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Message From The Country Remaster)

    "Leading the pack [on the Harvest Showdown collection] is the 7" edit of a cut that first appeared on the B-side of a three-track UK single, yet ironically went on to become the group's only stateside hit, albeit with a peak position of no. 93. Do Ya, written by Jeff Lynne, became one of the group's most-lauded items, with a subsequent life of its own. It was later covered by Todd Rundgren and ex-Kiss guitarist Ace Frehley, and became a regular part of ELO's set on stage in the mid-70s, with the result that they re-recorded it on A New World Record in 1976 and issued it as a single in the US in 1977, when it peaked at no. 24. Its original working title, taken from a vocal line during the song fadeout, was Look Out Baby, There's A Plane Comin'."
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Harvest Showdown review on ftmusic.com)

    "If you wanna hear Do Ya done proper, buy [the Message From The Country remaster]."
    Bun E. Carlos (October 2005 - Creem online Message From The Country remaster review)

    "The [Message From The Country] reissue bolsters 10 original tracks with nine additional ones, including... the raw, original version of Do Ya, finally a U.S. hit five years later when Lynne emerged as a radiowave mastermind."
    Erik Himmelsbach (December 2005 - Blender Magazine)

    "Wood, Lynne and drummer Bev Bevan were already working on ELO material when they recorded the Move's swan song, but the real bridge between the two bands never made it onto Message From The Country: ELO hit Do Ya. The bombastic ELO version is well-known, but here in its nascent b-side form, it's a blissed-out pop tune with pleading, desperate lyrics. "
    J. Gabriel Boylan (January 2006 - MAGNET Magazine issue #70)

    "Both [the 2005 Message From The Country remaster and the 1994 Great Move! The Best Of The Move] include... that ultimate bonus cut, the radio-unready greatest-single-of-all-time nominee Do Ya."
    Robert Christgau (April 10, 2006 - Village Voice)

    "The final Move recording sessions took place from 7 and 19 December 1971-- less than two months after Wood, Bevan and Lynne, as the Electric Light + Orchestra, completed the final mix of their experimental debut album (released on 3 December). They recorded two songs, both subsequently released as singles, in different territories, both pointing in wildly differing directions. Do Ya, sung by Jeff Lynne, anticipated the sharp and polishes AOR strut that by the mid-'70s had come to dominate the rock mainstream. The other, California Man, was an irresistably greasy slice of rock 'n' roll revivalism that enabled The Move to go out in style-- with a Top Ten hit."
    Mark Paytress (October 2008 - Anthology 1966 - 1972 liner notes)

    "The final Move song recorded at Philips Studios on 19 December 1971, had a working title of Look Out Baby There's A Plane A' Coming. Originally a UK B-side to California Man, in America, the single was flipped and became the group's sole hit there during October 1972. [...] The session masters were missing for almost 30 years before being found with Do Ya, spliced onto an ELO tape reel."
    Author Unknown (October 2008 - Anthology 1966 - 1972 liner notes)

    "Just about every ELO single killed me. The first time I noticed [Jeff] was when The Move caught Do Ya. And I just thought that was this incredible thing. And it was. And then he later did it with ELO and it was a whole new look at that song. It was really good."
    Tom Petty (2012 Summer - Mr Blue Sky: The Story of Jeff Lynne and ELO documentary)

    "Ha! When I wrote [Do Ya], I was actually in the Move and it was a song I was doing in my front room in Birmingham on my B&L tape recorder. And I got a great sound on the original demos. I was really loving the song, the actual backing track that I made. As luck would have it, they put it out in America and it got into the Top 100 for some reason, which was great, it was a surprise to me."
    Jeff Lynne (October 9, 2012 - The All Music Blog website)

    "Songs such as Strange Magic, Do Ya, Mr. Blue Sky and Don't Bring Me Down have permanently fused with the very fabric of pop culture."
    Chaz Lipp (November 1, 2012 - The Morton Report)

    "No, I didn't write [California Man]. Roy Wood wrote that. I wrote Do Ya which is on the same album... the single's actually, swapped in America from California Man to Do Ya halfway through its release. And Do Ya was the only one that ever made the Top 40 by The Move, yeah."
    Jeff Lynne (October 29, 2012 - Deep Tracks SiriusXM radio show)

    "[Hearing The Move's version of Do Ya] just tickled me a bit because the drums are so small. All of it was a little bit small... tiny sounding. It was just that I was a very, very young producer then."
    Jeff Lynne (November 7, 2012 - Rockline)

    "Well, from The Move the one that hit me right away was Do Ya. That was a great version of the track. Why it wasn't a hit by The Move, I don't know, but I guess it became one later when he did it with ELO."
    Tom Petty (January 2013 - Goldmine magazine)

    "The last single by Jeff Lynne's prior band the Move and the only one to chart in the U.S. (No. 93 on the Hot 100) ends up being the seventh charted single for the group spun off from the Move, his Electric Light Orchestra."
    S. Victor Aaron (September 13, 2015 - Something Else! website review)

    The Move - Do Ya (7" Single Edit Version)
    This edit version of Do Ya, originally available only on the UK Harvest re-issue single (HAR 5086), simply cuts the song's bridge ("In the country where the sky touches down...").

    "While Harvest Showdown is an excellent compilation of hits, rarities and alternate takes, we deliberately included rare, different versions of Do Ya (7" single version) and Tonight (US edited single) to those that appear on the Message [sic] remaster."
    Rob Caiger (2005 - 1999-2005: Making Of A Remaster article on themoveonline.com)

    "Two years [after it's release on the B-side of California Man], Do Ya was released as a UK Harvest single in its own right. "
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Message From The Country Remaster)

    "Leading the pack [on the Harvest Showdown collection] is the 7-inch edit of a cut that first appeared on the B-side of a three-track UK single..."
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Harvest Showdown review on ftmusic.com)
    Editor's Note: This makes it sound as if the edit version first appeared on the 3-track California Man single, which is not the case. That single had the full version of the song.

    "This rare edited version was for a UK single A-side released in September 1974 to cash in on ELO, Roy Wood and Wizzard's chart success."
    Author Unknown (October 2008 - Anthology 1966 - 1972 liner notes)

    The Move - Do Ya (Alternate Version)
    This version of Do Ya differs from the standard single version in that it is a different mix, with slightly more prominent guitar throughout the song, especially the choruses. It has an extra guitar riff added to the beginning of the fourth and final chorus. And the "Look out baby there's a plane a'comin'" is pushed down into the mix and some goon show style addlibbing is mixed in over the song's ending. The song does not fade, but instead continues to the end of the take, which includes a bit of studio banter after the band finishs playing. There is a bit of studio banter and guitar at the song's beginning.

    "[The alternate version of Do Ya is] No hidden track [on the Message From The Country remaster], but it is included in far, far superior form."
    Rob Caiger (August 8, 2005 - Unexpected Messages mailing list)

    "Though The Move recorded many sessions for the BBC, their tape archive was notoriously bare when it came to the Wood-Lynne-Bevan line-up. Surprisingly, a mono version of Do Ya, recorded for BBC Radio 1's Dave Lee Travis Show, was found to have survived on a vinyl BBC transcription disc in rather poor condition and quality. The truth, though, began to reveal itself much later when a tape of the original recording session for Do Ya was recovered. Getting access to tapes from Don Arden's personal Jet Records archive had taken over 10 years but one multitrack tape in particular appeared to justify the long wait. This was a session master for ELO 2, which on closer inspection, revealed further tape spliced on at the end containing sessions for California Man (the full-length version complete with extra verse) and a track entitled Look Out Baby, There's A Plane Coming. This was obviously Do Ya but on playback, it also sounded similar to the BBC version. It transpired the band were far too busy recording to attend the BBC Studios, so instead of losing vital radio promotion, they did what other bands at the time did and prepared a 'remix' from their own session tape - and sent it to the BBC. Using the 'BBC' version as a guide but now with Abbey Road's studio wizardry, a new more explosive mix utilising the full-length recording of Do Ya was completed - and it sounds incredible (and in stereo too!)."
    Rob Caiger (2005 - 1999-2005: Making Of A Remaster article on themoveonline.com)

    The Move - Do Ya (Edited Alternate Version)
    The difference between this version and the original single version is there is more guitar throughout the song, especially the chorus. There is also an altogether different (non-fading) ending. It's the same as the alternate version heard on the 2005 Message From The Country remaster, but without the studio banter at the song's beginning and end with the end fading just as the take ends. The most significant difference from the alternate take on the remaster is that it is missing the added guitar just before the fourth and final chorus, cutting straight to the vocals the same as the standard single version. According to comments from Rob Caiger on the Face The Music fanclub website, he mentions about the full-length version that it was edited for BBC in 1972 and they have released the full-length version on the Message From The Country remaster. This version is assumed to be the edit actually sent to the BBC. It was known to have been bootlegged in the past after it was played on the BBC in the 1970s.

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (ELO 2 Tour)
    For the ELO 2 tour, this song may have only been performed at the North American concerts.

    A full version of The Move's Do Ya was used on the ELO 2 tour in the USA and is the only known song to have been bootlegged from that tour. Unlike later ELO tours, for the ELO 2 tour performances, the band performed The Move version, sans cellos and complete with Jeff adding the "Look out baby, there's a-plane a comin'" bit at the end. It first appeared on the Wholly Edison bootleg LP and is from the June 16, 1973 performance at Toronto's Massey Hall.

    "The show also contains the Move hit Do Ya, composed by Lynne - for that one the strings walk offstage."
    Author Unknown (July 17 1973 - The Boston Phoenix)

    Electric Light Orchesra - 10538 Overture (Long Beach May 12, 1974)
    (Uses a small portion of the Do Ya guitar riff)
    The opening guitar riff from Do Ya is played from [2:50 to 3:31] with a beautiful orchestral accompaniment.

    "Material from this [The Night The Light Went On In Long Beach] LP has appeared on the B-sides of the last three UK singles, and the live 10538 Overture (with its teasing, truncated Do Ya riff in the middle) is the American B-side of Evil Woman."
    Joel Bellman (December 1976 - Trouser Press #17)

    Electric Light Orchesra - 10538 Overture (Remix Version) (Long Beach May 12, 1974)
    (Uses a small portion of the Do Ya guitar riff)
    This remix version of 10538 Overture is different from the original 1974 The Night The Light Went On In Long Beach album in that fifteen extra seconds of 10538 Overture guitar riffs are added in at the [4:36] mark. The sound is mixed to better sound quality.

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (Winterland February 14, 1976)
    This medley has 10538 Overture from [0:00 to 2:56] and the remainder ([2:56 to 5:27]) as Do Ya.

    "The 10538 Overture/Do Ya medley is another fantastic performance."
    Theodore Vrandt (February 21, 2007 - Live At Winterland '76 CD review)

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (London June 20, 1976)
    "Back then, I could never understand the words to 10538 Overture, and Kelly's saying 'Sing along with it!' The nutters did punch the air and jump about a bit, which I found strange. The break into Do Ya was the reason, and by acknowledging it showed you were 'a true fan'. Wow!"
    Rob Caiger (1991 - Face The Music fanzine #9)

    Electric Light Orchestra - 10538 Overture/Do Ya (Portsmouth June 22, 1976)
    "The [1999 Live At The BBC] CD manages to leave off three tracks from those originally broadcast by the BBC - Ma Ma Ma Belle (from Golders Green Hippodrome) and 10538 Overture / Do Ya (from Portsmouth)."
    Rob Caiger (July 19, 1999 - Showdown mailing list)
    Editor's Note: Roll Over Beethoven, Hugh McDowell's cello solo and Mik Kaminski's violin solo were also left off this CD.

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Electric Light Orchestra Version)
    "Containing as it does a curiously redundant version of the Move gem Do Ya (which Jeff Lynne wrote four years ago) along with a package of songs that rather re-echoes ELO's material from the last couple of years, the cynic might regard A New World Record as the work of a creative person (Lynne) in the process of stealing from himself. A more generous observer (myself for instance) might view this gentle treading of the creative waters as merely temporary -- the workings of a band, now peaking in popularity, that is attempting to supply audiences with exactly the sound they want to hear."
    Alan Niester (1976 December 16 - Rolling Stone review of A New World Record)

    "Here's an interesting look at ELO's progress. The song Do Ya. It was originally done by the Move shortly after Jeff Lynne joined. Four years later, Jeff Lynne took another crack at Do Ya."
    Robert W. Morgan (late 1976 - The Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week radio show)

    "I always thought [Do Ya] was a good song, y'know. I was always very pleased with it. It was so popular still, when we'd play it on stage, a lot of the audience knew Do Ya. And so I decided it would be nice to make it into an ELO song 'cause it was me, uh... I think it's one of me good songs."
    Jeff Lynne (late 1976 - The Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week radio show)

    "We re-recorded Do Ya. That's by public demand. Everyone else is doing it, so we figured we might as well."
    Bev Bevan (December 1976 - Trouser Press #17)

    "For whatever reason, they have actually included a version of Do Ya which sounds like a Sweet-ened version with violins. It's not really a new interpretation, it's more of a translation, an update."
    Joel Bellman (December 1976 - Trouser Press #17)

    "All of which brings us to the final past/present bridge in the form of a re-working of that very big hit song by the Move, namely the irrepressable Do Ya. Why had the band decided to record it? 'Well,' laughs Bev, 'everybody else seems to be doing it these days, so we figured we should give it a go-- it is Jeff's song, after all. We always said that we'd never do any Move material onstage because we really had no connection to it anymore, but we've found that it's immensely popular onstage. We just hit the opening chords and people go crazy. We kept the arrangement pretty much intact from the original, but I think it's more powerful, especially with the strings, the middle part is really something with the strings undercutting.'"
    Billy Altman (January 17, 1977 - Circus magazine)

    "There's not much that's classical about Do Ya, is there?"
    Jeff Lynne (April 2, 1977 - Melody Maker)

    "As you probably know, the Move's hit Do Ya later became a hit for the Electric Light Orchestra. Now it had always been a popular song in their live shows. And then other people began playing and recording the tune. But an interviewer brought home the point when he asked Bev if he'd ever heard the original version by Todd Rundgren. It was at that point that they decided to record the tune again and let people know it was their very own."
    Chuck Marshall (April 24, 1977 - Rock Around The World #142)

    "[The Move's] Do Ya would also become an ELO hit on A New World Record."
    Steve Wosahla (April 10, 1978 Good Times #194)

    "After the melodic peaks scaled by So Fine, Livin' Thing and Above The Clouds [on A New World Record], the powerchords that signal the start of Do Ya sound out of place. Which of course, they were. Diehard fans recognised it immediately as an old Move track, the B-side of the UK California Man single, and the band's only US hit (albeit a lowly No. 96). Jeff said at the time that he liked the track a lot, and he wanted it to be an ELO song rather than a Move number, so he completely revamped it, pulling out all the stops with a 1976-style ELO production, complete with (by now) standard strings and orchestra, meaty drums, and what can only be described as full-blooded guitar and vocals! All in all, a polished addition to the A New World Record set. Perhaps too polished. On the way, a lot of the song's original humour and hammy appeal is lost, but the spirit of the 1972 song lives on. The Move version faded with the ridiculous but likeable line 'watch out baby there's a plane a-coming' [sic], and far back in the mix of the 1976 version, Jeff sings 'Ah, look out' just before the song's close. All things considered, the song stands the test of time remarkably well, seeing how much musical water had passed under the bridge in the intervening four years, and the number subsequently became a stage favourite in its own right, rather than as just part of 10538 Overture."
    Unknown (1989 - Face The Music fanzine #6)

    "Do Ya was a song, yeah, that I'd written in the Move, um, in about 1970-- '71. And, it wasn't that old, really. It was only like five years old-- four years old, eh. Which is pretty old, I suppose. It was a big song, like big loud, like a loud song, um, mainly just guitars. And it was never heard really. Um, it got into the charts in America, really, about 173 or something, which was doing quite well. And I always liked the song and I always thought I wish I could, y'know, just redo it. And just have... just so somebody could hear it. 'Cause no one ever heard it, really. [Imitating someone:] 'No, I never heard of that one.' And I was always really pleased with the tune. And so, I rerecorded it. Y'know, in hindsight, it's probably not as good as the first one-- version I did. Um, technically it's better, but there's something missing, I think, like the spontaneity of the original version. It hasn't got that because it's obviously, uh, more contrived than that because we got strings on it and everybody's doing this, that and the other. Everybody knows what to play, so it's not really, uh, um... It's not as rock and roll as the original, even though it's louder. The guitars are really distorted on it. But it's good. I mean I'm... I'm still pleased with it."
    Jeff Lynne (August 21, 1990 - Classic Albums radio interview by Roger Scott)

    "Surprisingly, a remake of [The Move's] Do Ya was among [the songs on A New World Record]. Lynne explaines why ELO re-recorded this old Move classic, a chunk of which had long been stuck into ELO's live version of 10538 Overture. 'It did sort of well by the Move, and everyone always said how much they loved it. We had this big new audience, and I thought maybe they'd like it.' But he reckons the Move original is better. 'It's got a certain charm, however rough it might be.'"
    Ira Robbins (1990 liner notes for Afterglow)

    "For [the A New World Record] album Jeff re-recorded his old Move hit Do Ya in a new version, because he always had wanted it to be an E.L.O. song."
    Patrik Guttenbacher, Marc Haines, & Alexander von Petersdorff (1996 Unexpected Messages)

    "My favorite guitar song: I suppose it would have to be Do Ya, really, 'cause that's the loudest guitar song that I do."
    Jeff Lynne (June 12, 2001 - interview with DJs Mark & Brian on 95.5 KLOS)

    "Rockaria! was another huge single hit in the UK while Do Ya was a new interpretation of Lynne's original Move composition and that group's sole USA single hit. The ELO version was released in the USA and Europe and became a hit for the second time. "
    Author Unknown (March 31, 2003 - website only expanded liner notes for ELO 2 remaster CD)

    "...Do Ya was a new version of Lynne's original composition for The Move and a hit for the second time."
    Rob Caiger (2003 liner notes for The Collection)

    "A New World Record was a creative high point with... an anthemic remake of a Move song, Do Ya."
    Jaan Uhelszki (April 1 2003 liner notes for The Essential Electric Light Orchestra)

    "Monster's new advertising campaign sets a positive, personal, and exciting tone for job seekers. The first commercial, titled 'New Monster. New You,' debuts today and will air throughout the month of June in primetime, late night, and early morning on network and cable stations including CBS, NBC, ESPN, TBS, TNT, USA, VH-1, E!, Soapnet, and Comedy Central. To the tune of Electric Light Orchestra's 1970s hit Do Ya, the spot features Monster's newly redesigned website and celebrates the pure joy and excitement of finding the right job and making good things happen for your career. Additional televisions spots, along with print advertising in national weekly, monthly, and trade publications, will launch over the summer. The TV and print ads were created by Boston-based Brand Content. Monster will also be heard and seen across Infinity's Broadcasting's 180 radio stations and their corresponding websites in 41 U.S. markets. As part of our strategic marketing agreement with Internet Broadcasting Systems, Inc., Monster's new campaign will have extensive online presence through Internet Broadcasting's 58 affiliate's news and information sites, as well as thousands of other websites."
    Unknown (June 1, 2005 - Business Wire)

    "Most shocking about All Over the World [sic] is that while the earlier collection had space to include not only Roll Over Beethoven but also included the catchy Do Ya, the newer collection includes neither. Owners of this collection will be kicking themselves and cursing the gods at this omission."
    Raul Burriel (August 14, 2005 - The Trades All Over the World: The Very Best of Electric Light Orchestra review)

    "Although the recently issued compilation All Over the World: The Very Best of Electric Light Orchestra contains many of ELO's biggest hits, it differs from its predecessor The Essential Electric Light Orchestra in that it forsakes several vital singles (Can't Get It Out of My Head and Do Ya) in favor of lesser known material."
    John Metzger (August 2005 - The Music Box Volume 12, #8)

    "A revamped version [of The Move's Do Ya] appeared on ELO's sixth album A New World Record in 1976."
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Message From The Country Remaster)

    "[The Electric Light Orchestra] re-recorded [The Move's Do Ya] on A New World Record in 1976 and issued it as a single in the US in 1977, when it peaked at no. 24."
    John Van der Kiste (September 5, 2005 - Harvest Showdown review on ftmusic.com)

    "A New World Record went mutli-platinum and even found them time to prove how far they'd come since those Move days by including a rejig of Do Ya."
    Dom Passantino (October 24, 2005 - Stylus online magazine)

    "[With the song Change Of Heart] I was trying to write an ELO kind of song. I think the inspiration was Do Ya. [Sings chordal pattern.] I was a fan of ELO. And I knew Jeff Lynne when he was in The Move. We used to listen to The Move. We'd get the records imported from England. Benmont would get them. So I actually wanted Jeff Lynne to produce our second record, You're Gonna Get It. I don't know why it never happened. I think it was that he was too busy, and he didn't do outside productions at the time. But I wanted to bring him in then and do a record with him. I always had this hope that we could get to work with him. [...] I loved the way [Jeff Lynne] used chords. So I was trying to write my own kind of riff like that [on Change Of Heart]. [Sings riff.] And I think the words came later. I don't think I had the title till later. [...] But, yeah, I think I wanted it to sound like Do Ya? [sic] [Sings crunchy guitar chords.] I wanted to do something that had that kind of guitar, and that was the kick-off point. Not one of my great songs. But it's a good rock song."
    Tom Petty (November 1, 2005 - Conversations With Tom Petty)

    "By the mid-1970s, Wood had moved off to do his solo thing, leaving Lynne and drummer Bevan as the core members of ELO. Their New World Record [sic] album featured this brash remake of a tune that first appeared in 1972 as the B-side to the Move's California Man. The song itself is the ultimate three-chord trick: a power-pop classic."
    David Cheal (December 8, 2005 - The Daily Telegraph)

    "Monster Worldwide Inc.'s namesake jobs Web site has used a song made famous in 1977 by Electric Light Orchestra, Do Ya, in ads since last year. 'This works across multitudes,' says John Kelley, the Web site's senior vice president of marketing."
    Brian Steinberg and Ethan Smith (June 9, 2006 - Wall Street Journal)

    "Do Ya is a song I first wrote and recorded with The Move about 5 years before this version. I really liked the original and I felt it would be nice to record this song again or our ELO audience to hear."
    Jeff Lynne (September 11 2006 - A New World Record remaster liner notes)

    "Do Ya was originally composed by Jeff Lynne for The Move. Their only hit in the U.S.A., it had long achieved cult status in that country and ELO had been performing it during their American tours. It was so popular that Lynne included an ELO version on the new album with it becoming a hit for the second time when released as a single. Jeff Lynne: 'Well, I always loved Do Ya from the first time in The Move, when I first wrote it and realised that nobody ever heard it really, very much... I thought it would be nice to do it again, so now we've got this big audience and this song that I really liked that never got much of a chance before.'"
    Rob Caiger (September 11 2006 - A New World Record remaster liner notes)

    "[A New World Record features] the bubblegum hard rock of Do Ya."
    Jon Dolan (October 2006 - Spin magazine)

    "And the entire planet seemed to love Telephone Line, Rockaria!, Livin' Thing and Do Ya. The latter, incidentally, can currently be heard on 'Monster.com' TV adverts and all the above became solid ELO songbook entries."
    Lindsay Planer (November 6, 2006 - MusicTAP On The Third Day, Face The Music and A New World Record remaster review)

    "[A New World Record] features the hit's [sic] Livin' Thing, Telephone Line, and Lynne's best straight-ahead rock song Do Ya' [sic]."
    Barry Nothstine (2006 - The Phantom Tollbooth On The Third Day, Face The Music and A New World Record remaster review)

    "Also excellent is Do Ya, a far less subtle remake of Lynne's earlier Move hit, betters the original with sharper production, more conviction in the vocals (with Queen-style falsettos and layering), and an effective use of the orchestra to build up the song's dynamics."
    Rob Horning (2007 February 16 - On The Third Day, Face The Music and A New World Record reissue review on popmatters.com)

    "Featuring the hits Telephone Line, Livin' Thing and a hit remake of the Move's Do Ya, [A New World Record] put ELO in the big leagues once and for all."
    Scott Homewood (2007 February 2 - On The Third Day, Face The Music and A New World Record reissue review on cdreviews.com)

    "Originally composed by Lynne for The Move, it became the group's sole American hit. Do Ya built up such a cult following on ELO's early USA tours that Lynne '...felt it would be nice to record this song again for our ELO audience to hear.' Re-recorded in 1976 for ELO's first worldwide Top 10 album A New World Record, the track was released in America and Europe and became a hit again for an even bigger audience."
    Rob Caiger (October 2007 - liner notes for Ticket To The Moon - The Very Best Of The Electric Light Orchestra Volume 2)

    "Just about every ELO single killed me. The first time I noticed [Jeff] was when The Move caught Do Ya. And I just thought that was this incredible thing. And it was. And then he later did it with ELO and it was a whole new look at that song. It was really good."
    Tom Petty (2012 Summer - Mr Blue Sky: The Story of Jeff Lynne and ELO documentary)

    "Do Ya (A New World Record, 1976): The last single by Jeff Lynne's prior band The Move and the only one to chart in the U.S. (No. 93 on the Hot 100) ends up being the seventh charted single for the group spun off from The Move, the Electric Light Orchestra. This time, it reached No. 24 in April of 1977. ELO had never rocked harder. At least, not on radio. With its violin/cello players and even a full orchestra supplementing the normal four piece rock band, it managed to become uniquely ELO. So yeah, a new, symphonic coda was added, but the crunch of the original carried over intact. By this time, Lynne had achieved complete mastery of the delicate balance between rock and orchestral arrangements, and even the heavy presence of strings didn't do anything to take away from the song's raw, cocksure bent, with Lynne growling and boasting to his target for affections about all the things he's seen 'but never seen nuttin' like you.' Interestingly, it was Todd Rundgren who was the first to cover this song (Utopia's 1975 release Another Live) before Lynne revisited his own tune for ELO. Rundgren was the guy who took a near-hit (Hello It's Me) for his former band (The Nazz) and later made it into a major hit for himself. Lynne would soon follow the same strategy with Do Ya, and got the same results."
    S. Victor Aaron (August 2, 2012 - Something Else! website review)

    "When ELO started to do well, I thought that Do Ya should be brought into an ELO mode and it worked great. And that's why I recorded it again. "
    Jeff Lynne (October 9, 2012 - The All Music Blog website)

    "Do Ya was the Move's only chart single in the U.S. (it stalled at No. 93 in 1971). Five years later, Lynne revisited his song with ELO, this time hitting the Top 20. Unlike many of the tracks on our list of the Top 10 Electric Light Orchestra Songs, Do Ya keeps the classical elements to a minimum. The song -- one of the band's toughest cuts -- features one of rock's all-time greatest guitar riffs."
    Michael Gallucci (December 30, 2012 - Ultimate Classic Rock online magazine article 'Top 10 Electric Light Orchestra Songs')

    "Well, from The Move the one that hit me right away was Do Ya. That was a great version of the track. Why it wasn't a hit by The Move, I don't know, but I guess it became one later when he did it with ELO."
    Tom Petty (January 2013 - Goldmine magazine)

    "Do Ya was such a good song I wanted the ELO audience to [hear] it. They loved it on-stage so we re-recorded in a slightly different arrangement."
    Jeff Lynne (May 2013 - Uncut magazine)

    "Still, for those looking for something to connect the dots back to the muscular crunch of Do Ya (head straight to the stamping State of Mindi)... Zoom is perhaps the best ELO album you’ve never heard."
    Nick DeRiso (June 13, 2015 - Something Else! website Zoom review)

    "The last single by Jeff Lynne's prior band the Move and the only one to chart in the U.S. (No. 93 on the Hot 100) ends up being the seventh charted single for the group spun off from the Move, his Electric Light Orchestra. Released as part of A New World Record on September 11, 1976, Do Ya reached No. 24 in April of 1977. The Electric Light Orchestra had never rocked harder. At least, not on radio. With its violin/cello players and even a full orchestra supplementing the normal four piece rock band, the remake of Do Ya managed to become uniquely ELO. So yeah, a new, symphonic coda was added, but the crunch of the original carried over intact. By this time, Jeff Lynne had achieved complete mastery of the delicate balance between rock and orchestral arrangements, and even the heavy presence of the Electric Light Orchestra's patented strings didn't do anything to take away from the song's raw, cocksure bent, with Lynne growling and boasting to his target for affections about all the things he's seen 'but never seen nuttin' like you.' Interestingly, it was Todd Rundgren who was the first to cover this song (Utopia's 1975 release Another Live) before Jeff Lynne revisited his own tune with the Electric Light Orchestra. Rundgren was the guy who took a near-hit (Hello It's Me) for his former band (The Nazz) and later made it into a major hit for himself. Jeff Lynne would soon follow the same strategy with Do Ya, and got the same results."
    S. Victor Aaron (September 13, 2015 - Something Else! website review)

    "ELO has always had a strong rock catalog, with hits like Do Ya, Evil Woman, and Ma-Ma-Ma Belle to back up the more adventurous tunes in their repertoire."
    William Hoffman (October 16, 2015 - Music Times)

    "[On A New World Record] there was also a sterling cover of The Move's Do Ya."
    Mark Blake (November 2015 - Classic Rock magazine)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (USA Mono Single Version)
    This is a mono version of the standard version on the A New World Record album.

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Edited A Perfect World Of Music LP Version)
    This version differs from the A New World Record version in that it cuts everything from after the second chorus to the beginning of the third and last chorus.

    "Jet's last major output was a compilation album in February 1985 A Perfect World Of Music(!). It's LP version included edited versions of All Over The World and Do Ya."
    Patrik Guttenbacher, Marc Haines, & Alexander von Petersdorff (1996 Unexpected Messages)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Unedited Alternate Mix)
    The difference between this version and the A New World Record version is that it has + different mix, including additional strings on the bridge, additional percussion, additional background vocals, lead vocals more up front in the mix, and extra guitar riffs on the intro and bridge.

    "I'm glad I recently came across this version, 'cos I think it's better than the edited one that's always been around."
    Jeff Lynne (2000 - Flashback)

    "This is a version I found in my box of tapes, y'know, which is about as big as this room. Um... and, uh, when I found it, I realized it was a totally different mix from the one that had been on all those other records. And, um, y'know, I was quite pleased with it, because... the reason I think it's so different is I'd just finished the backing vocals, so they're very prominent in this version."
    Jeff Lynne (June 6, 2001 - Rockline)

    "It's a slightly different mix with the backing vocals up a lot louder and about two or three edits taken out of it. From the same session as the originals, but a different day, a different part of the process. I think we'd just done the backing vocals and that's why they were loud on this particular mix. I just like it better because it flows better with this extra length. "
    Jeff Lynne (2001 - elomusic.com website)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (The Midnight Special - February, 1977)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (A New World Record Tour)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Wembley - June 1978)
    "To fans of Do Ya, Evil Woman, Livin' Thing and Strange Magic, it was an evening of pure delight. [...] Do Ya, a Move song redone by ELO, was the best tune they did, coming at the end of the concert. Bassist Kelly Groucutt sang and Lynne pounded out power chords that rocked the rafters (here, at least, his playing cut through the 'orchestra')."
    Carl Diltz (August 20, 1978 - St. Paul Pioneer Press concert review)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Stereo Mix Wembley 1978)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (5.1 Mix Wembley 1978)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Time Tour)
    "[The Time tour USA] set list differs to UK - Strange Magic played instead of Wild West Hero, and Do Ya performed complete, whilst Don't Bring Me Down performed minus audience participation."
    Rob Caiger (1992 - Face The Music fanzine #13)

    "In the USA they played... Do Ya as another encore in its full version. On Do Ya, by the way Jeff played the heaviest guitar riff he ever played on it."
    Patrik Guttenbacher, Marc Haines, & Alexander von Petersdorff (1996 Unexpected Messages)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Rocker Medley: Ma-Ma-Ma Belle/Do Ya/Rockaria! (Heartbeat 86, March 15 1986)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Rocker Medley: Ma-Ma-Ma Belle/Do Ya/Rockaria! (Balance Of Power Tour)
    "Rockaria! (with Dave Morgan singing the opera vocals)..."
    Patrik Guttenbacher, Marc Haines, & Alexander von Petersdorff (1996 Unexpected Messages)

    Electric Light Orchestra - ELO Remix - 40 Principales (featuring a Do Ya sample)
    This curious remix was officially released on a Spanish issue promo only 7" single, thought to be part of the Spanish only The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra promotion (which was a trimmed down Spanish version of the USA-issued Afterglow set). It contains a mix of the ELO songs Don't Bring Me Down [0:00 to 0:42], I'm Alive [0:42 to 1:27], Do Ya [1:27 to 2:26], Hold On Tight [2:26 to 3:25], and Rock 'n' Roll Is King [3:25 to 4:51] and in that order.

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (VH1 Storytellers, April 20, 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Los Angeles, May 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (5.1 Mix - Los Angeles, May 2001)

    Electric Light Orchestra - Do Ya (Solo Version)
    This version of Do Ya is believe to have been originally recorded (along with several other solo remakes) in 2008 in anticipation of a new greatest hits album. However, with the delays in that project, the initial release hasn't been until the use of the song and subsequent soundtrack album release for the 2012 film, Savages. This version, by Jeff Lynne alone, is a remake of the 1976 Electric Light Orchestra version, rather than the 1971 Move version.

    "[Regarding the cowbell on the re-recording of Do Ya...] Hey, don't knock it. I've tried for years to learn that. Absolutely [I was thinking of the cowbell skit from Saturday Night Live]! Of course that little joke kept going around in my head as I was doing it. Then when I played the mixes for somebody, I put the cowbell up ridiculously loud, just for fun."
    Jeff Lynne (October 3, 2012 - Musicradar website)

    "Lynne worked six days a week [on ] perfecting songs including Do Ya, Evil Woman, Strange Magic, and Don't Bring Me Down. He did this at home, mostly on his own. 'I just love playing all the instruments and going back and thinking fucking hell, I did all that.'"
    Katie Bain (October 9, 2012 - L.A. Weekly)

    "When ELO started to do well, I thought that Do Ya should be brought into an ELO mode and it worked great. And that's why I recorded it again. This time, I recorded it again because I wanted it in me Top 11 [Mr. Blue Sky: The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra]. "
    Jeff Lynne (October 9, 2012 - The All Music Blog website)

    "Yeah, when you do it the second time-- It's actually the third time I've done this one [Do Ya] 'cause I did it in The Move and ELO and I did it again, now on Mr. Blue Sky [sic]-- they always take on a life of their own, these tunes. Even though you've played them thousands and thousands of times, they never are the same any time you record anything."
    Jeff Lynne (2012 November 30 - The Adam Carolla Show)

    "But for me, some of the reworkings [on Mr. Blue Sky The Very Best Of Electric Light Orchestra] are awful. It's no coincidence that I dislike most the new versions of A New World Record songs Telephone Line and iDo Ya. "
    Tim Cain (February 11, 2015 - Herald & Review)

    "For some, getting a good night’s sleep is akin to a sports team winning a championship. Or at least that’s the claim Simmons makes in a new commercial for its Recharge mattress, which uses ELO‘s hit Do Ya [the solo remake version] to make its point. In the clip, which you can watch above, a woman wakes up declaring that her Beautyrest mattress was responsible for 'the best night’s sleep.' So she decides to celebrate. As the song’s opening power chords are heard, she pops open an oversized bottle of champagne and sprays it on her husband, who’s still asleep. She then takes the bottle everywhere she goes, continuing to douse people and infuriating her neighbor, folks at the bus stop, co-workers, a woman in a sauna, a waiter and the audience at an opera. The bottle is still overflowing when she wishes her sleeping husband a good night and turns out the light. 'Look out world. I just got my Beautyrest' show up onscreen as we learn just what makes Simmons’ Recharge line of mattresses so different from others. Written by Jeff Lynne, Do Ya was originally recorded in 1972 by his previous band, the Move. It was the closest the group got to a pop hit, reaching No. 93 on the Billboard Hot 100. Todd Rundgren‘s Utopia covered it three years later on Another Live. When Lynne’s next project, ELO, recorded it for 1976’s A New World Record, it peaked at No. 24."
    Dave Lifton (July 6, 2015 - Ultimate Classic Rock online magazine article)

    This page is intended to be a complete record of information on The Move, the Electric Light Orchestra and Jeff Lynne songs Do Ya. If you notice any errors or omissions, please contact me at jefflynnesongs@gmail.com and let me know. I strive for accuracy.

    Robert Porter
    January 2017